Curt's Ad Hoc.

Clicking on the picture will open a seperate window with a larger view.
If the picture is larger than the new window, clicking again will toggle full view.

Work bench. Work bench.

This is the first workbench that I built.

I had no plan when I started, just an idea in my head. Since I wasn't planning on using the bench for heavy duty use (no hammering on top of it), I decided to make it out of pine. The problem with pine is, it warps and twist easy. With this in mind, I decided to cut the 2" x 4" in half (1" x 4"), then glue non-matching boards together to avoid the woods natural tendency to twist/warp.

I could only glue a set of 9 boards together in a group due to the planer input width. After the sets were planed to the proper thickness, it was just a matter of gluing the large blocks together.

Work bench. Work bench.

Now that the bench was roughly done, it was time to cut the ends off straight. I then realized I had a problem, my circular saw could not cut through the full thickness of the bench. I flipped the bench but after it was cut, the ends were not smooth. Lacking a better way, I decided to add a board to the end for a nice smooth finish.

Work bench. Work bench.

I needed a sturdy frame under the work bench and something that would be easy to move. The bench weighs about 150 pounds. After applying a clear stain, I was pleased with the results.

Work bench. Work bench.

I made the second bench for a friend as a wedding present. It didn't need to be as thick and the frame was improved to allow drawers to be added later, if they wanted them.

Work bench. Work bench.

I used a tip from a woodworker on how to make the frame easier to lift and set solid on the floor. The hole drilled into the wood was offset by 3/4" so the bench could be raised and lower by pressing down on the board. In the photo, you can see that the clamp was not moved to show the difference in height.